7 comments

  1. 🙂 I am glad you liked it!
    This was a marker-only doodle, so it’s far from perfect. I am resisting the urge to redraw.

    This morning I was leaving Panera Bread with my 20-oz caffeine fix, and I saw these two young’uns walking with their coffees and getting into a car. The girl had a phone in her back pocket and it really struck me: I spent most of the 90’s smoking 2 packs per day, and a lot of young people did the same back then, including pretty much all of my friends. Kids don’t smoke as much these days, which is a good thing. (The likes of me don’t smoke any more either, which is also a good thing!)

    Or, with less nostalgia, Donnie Berkholz aptly puts it — back pocket is where addictions are kept!

  2. Good for you that you no longer smoke! But as to: “I spent most of the 90’s smoking 2 packs per day, and a lot of young people did the same back then, including pretty much all of my friends” — I have to ask, was this in Europe? Because here in the states smoking was definitely out by the late ’80s early ’90s, when I was in high school and college.

  3. was this in Europe? Yep. Europeans also smoke way less these days, too.

    Because here in the states smoking was definitely out by the late ’80s early ’90s, when I was in high school and college. If you say so. But I will say that I did visit the US in the mid 90’s (’94 or ’95, I can’t remember), I was in Chicago for a month, and a lot of college kids smoked, especially when they went out. Based on my experience, smoking in the US in the 90’s was nowhere near the stigma that it is these days. I remember it was common to have smokers’ areas in airports and to smoke in bars at that time. But YMMV.

  4. The US was far from uniform in the 90s (and still isn’t). I suspect that “anonymous” was in California, where levels of smoking in the 90s were about what the rest of the country is at now.

  5. @anonymous: I was in college in the early 2000’s at a midwestern SLAC, and smoking rates were probably… 25% or so. And among non college goers closer to 50%, from what I could tell. The smoking bans are what started the declines and those didn’t happen in my state until 2005 which was kind of the middle of the “wave” IIRC.

  6. Hmmm … interesting. I went to HS (large and public) in FL and college (smallish and elite) in MA. Easily less than 20% of the students at both places smoked. Then I went to Europe to teach HS for a year at a fancy boarding school … and my students demanded smoking breaks! So much more smoking there among my peers, too.

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